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06/30/2008 ● By Super Admin

Placerville resident Normadene Carpenter has greatly influenced her community over the years. She founded the Marble Valley Regional Center for the Arts in 1978, and over the past 30 years, she has served as board member, past president, and volunteer office manager. Carpenter has also been involved with the Friends of the Library of El Dorado County, El Dorado County Community Concerts Association, Progress House, El Dorado Arts Council, the American Heart Association, Golden Empire Health Planning Council and the California Epsilon and Sigma Rho Pi Units of the National Association of Parliamentarians. She also served as emeritus member of the California State Association for Medical Laboratory Technology and as president of the Placerville branch of the AAUW. She has been the recipient of many awards including the Spirit of El Dorado, Philanthropy Award of the National Association of Fund Raising Executives, and various community service awards from the El Dorado County and Cameron Park/Shingle Springs Chamber of Commerce, Soroptimist International of Placerville, and the Placerville Branch American Association of University of Women. She is registered with the National Association of parliamentarians and assists various regional and national organizations. Carpenter graduated from the University of California at Berkeley and is a retired Public Health Microbiologist and Clinical Laboratory Scientist. It’s clear that Normadene is dedicated to her work and her community, and for this she’s an inspiration to all!— Heather GrubbFor more on Normadene Carpenter, be sure to pick up this month's copy of FoothillStyle. Click on the "Get Your Copy" link on the bottom of this page for some of our newsstand locations. Or, to order a copy of this issue, please email Gloria Schroeder at gloria@sierrastyle.com, or call her at 916-988-9888 x116.

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Stress and Anxiety

06/30/2008 ● By Super Admin

Just thinking about some of the causes of stress and anxiety - such as job pressure, money, relationships and illness, are enough to make your blood pressure rise. Stress and anxiety cause a myriad of health problems, from sleep disorders to heart disease. The solution to alleviating stress is evaluating priorities. We think that we don't have enough time, but in all actuality we do have the control and ability to bring our lives back into balance. Exercise is one of the most important things that we can do to positively affect both our physical and mental health. Sometimes just setting aside time each day to turn your mind "off" (even just 15 minutes) will quickly provide anxiety relief, not to mention this time dedicated to exercise or an aerobic activity will benefit your heart. According to Lisa Marrero, General Manager of Roseville Health and Wellness Center, "Exercise raises the levels of certain mood enhancing neurotransmitters in the brain. It may also boost feel-good endorphins, release muscle tension, help you sleep better and reduce levels of the stress hormone cortisol." Marrero adds, "Mental health providers are prescribing exercise to their patients more and more." As we know, mental health and physical health are intertwined and can be dependent on one another. According to the American Council on Exercise, "Recent studies have shown that when large muscle groups repeatedly contract and relax, the brain receives a signal to release specific neurotransmitters, which in turn make you feel relaxed and more alert." JC Charles from the Folsom Health and Wellness Center also says, "A healthy body means a healthy mind. If you don't have a way to release your stress, it may manifest itself in illness." According to Steve Harrity of Cameron Park Physical Therapy and Wellness, some of the symptoms associated with stress and anxiety include tension headaches, postural changes, depression and a change in the perception of pain (intensified pain response). Harrity suggests the following alternative therapies to help reverse some of these symptoms: yoga, massage, stretching techniques, relaxation and visualization. "By putting yourself in a calmer, more positive place, you are avoiding the negative mindset that often brings on an anxiety attack," says Harrity. In the event exercise is not an option at the time of an anxiety attack, taking time to yourself is a good solution. Harrity recommends communicating with your spouse, boss or friends to let them know your needs during this time. If you are dealing with stress and anxiety, you may want to seek help from a therapist, life coach, personal trainer or other health professional skilled in helping you bring your health back into balance. For more about tips on reducing stress and anxiety, be sure to pick up this month's copy of FoothillStyle edition. Click on the "Get Your Copy" link on the bottom of this page for some of our newsstand locations. Or, to order a copy of this issue, please email Gloria Schroeder at gloria@sierrastyle.com, or call her at 916-988-9888 x116.

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Stress and Anxiety

06/30/2008 ● By Super Admin

Just thinking about some of the causes of stress and anxiety - such as job pressure, money, relationships and illness, are enough to make your blood pressure rise. Stress and anxiety cause a myriad of health problems, from sleep disorders to heart disease. The solution to alleviating stress is evaluating priorities. We think that we don't have enough time, but in all actuality we do have the control and ability to bring our lives back into balance. Exercise is one of the most important things that we can do to positively affect both our physical and mental health. Sometimes just setting aside time each day to turn your mind "off" (even just 15 minutes) will quickly provide anxiety relief, not to mention this time dedicated to exercise or an aerobic activity will benefit your heart. According to Lisa Marrero, General Manager of Roseville Health and Wellness Center, "Exercise raises the levels of certain mood enhancing neurotransmitters in the brain. It may also boost feel-good endorphins, release muscle tension, help you sleep better and reduce levels of the stress hormone cortisol." Marrero adds, "Mental health providers are prescribing exercise to their patients more and more." As we know, mental health and physical health are intertwined and can be dependent on one another. According to the American Council on Exercise, "Recent studies have shown that when large muscle groups repeatedly contract and relax, the brain receives a signal to release specific neurotransmitters, which in turn make you feel relaxed and more alert." JC Charles from the Folsom Health and Wellness Center also says, "A healthy body means a healthy mind. If you don't have a way to release your stress, it may manifest itself in illness." According to Steve Harrity of Cameron Park Physical Therapy and Wellness, some of the symptoms associated with stress and anxiety include tension headaches, postural changes, depression and a change in the perception of pain (intensified pain response). Harrity suggests the following alternative therapies to help reverse some of these symptoms: yoga, massage, stretching techniques, relaxation and visualization. "By putting yourself in a calmer, more positive place, you are avoiding the negative mindset that often brings on an anxiety attack," says Harrity. In the event exercise is not an option at the time of an anxiety attack, taking time to yourself is a good solution. Harrity recommends communicating with your spouse, boss or friends to let them know your needs during this time. If you are dealing with stress and anxiety, you may want to seek help from a therapist, life coach, personal trainer or other health professional skilled in helping you bring your health back into balance. For more about tips on reducing stress and anxiety, be sure to pick up this month's copy of Style-Folsom El Dorado Hills edition. Click on the "Get Your Copy" link on the bottom of this page for some of our newsstand locations. Or, to order a copy of this issue, please email Gloria Schroeder at gloria@sierrastyle.com, or call her at 916-988-9888 x116.

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Staying Active

06/30/2008 ● By Super Admin

OK, I need to provide full disclosure here. Most, if not all of the “seniors” I know, in particular my parents and in-laws, have more energy and a more vibrant social life than those of us of a younger generation. They travel around the world, attend countless social events, and can traipse off to Hawaii at the drop of a hat.Let’s face it, today’s 70 is the new 40. Those “experienced in life” are taking better care of themselves and living longer, more fulfilling lives. I’d like to think it’s partly because there are so many wonderful opportunities for involvement and enrichment in their lives.The El Dorado Hills Senior Center (916-358-3575) provides a wealth of phenomenal classes and activities, with something for everyone at every fitness level. Yoga, book clubs, dancing, movie nights and more, provide connections and entertainment for anyone seeking to stay active. However, for some seniors we talked to, they weren’t simply looking to be entertained. Rather, they sought opportunities for community involvement and a chance to make a difference. And in the midst of their busy lives, they wanted what little “down time” they had to really count. As we explored the staggering need for volunteers and mentors right here in our community, we pulled out just some of the openings available to those with life experience, compassion and hopefully a little spare time.Become a Mentor to Small Businesses Seniors with a business background can serve as professional mentors for organizations like SCORE – Counselors to America’s Small Business (sacscore.org, 916-635-9085), which utilizes retired executives to assist small businesses and start-ups. As Jeff Hendy, chapter president for Greater Sacramento, says, “We are always looking for new volunteer counselors… it is a good opportunity to give back to the existing and emerging businesses in our community.”Support Our TroopsThere are amazing local support groups throughout our area that invite and coordinate an outpouring of support to our men and women in the armed services. Volunteers are continually needed to help stuff care packages, coordinate fundraisers and donations, and keep the effort strong.Toys for the Troops Kids is one such local organization (toysforthetroopskids.org).Make Blankets for ChildrenProject Linus (projectlinus.org, 916-965-8955) provides new, handmade blankets to seriously ill and traumatized children in our community. If you love to quilt, crochet or sew, they can use your talents.Help Care for AnimalsOur county-run and non-profit shelters are desperate for help caring for, and giving a voice to, animals. Local animal rescue operations would love to get your call offering administrative or in-field assistance. The Grace Foundation of El Dorado Hills (thegracefoundationofnorcal.org) and Folsom Feline Rescue (folsomfelines.org, 916-484-4099) are two organizations that could use your help.Become a Foster GrandparentThrough the vital Senior Corps Program, seniors can make a difference in the life of a child by mentoring troubled kids, caring for premature newborns and helping abused children. Visit seniorcorps.gov for more information. Participate in Focus Groups Get paid for your life-formed opinions and input. Focus group research is vital in today’s market-based economy, and it pays an average of $75-$150 for an hour-long focus group. To find a focus group near you, visit Senior Corps online at seniorcorps.gov, or Opinions of Sacramento Focus Groups at opinionsofsac.comVolunteer on a Political CampaignA unique opportunity this summer is the chance to volunteer on a political campaign, or for a party-affiliated organization. There are several races at the local, state and federal levels, and the campaigns or parties themselves welcome volunteers in all capacities. Find out how you can get involved by calling your local party representatives: El Dorado County Republican Party, edcgop.com, 530-676-4757; El Dorado County Democratic Party, edcdemocrats.org, 530-626-8270.Serve as a Museum DocentPut your love and appreciation for history or art to good use by serving as a volunteer tour guide at any of our regional museums.The Folsom History Museum is always looking for volunteers. Visit folsomhistorymuseum.org, or call 916-985-2707 to find out how you can help.Volunteer at Thrift Stores These non-profits directly support causes like hospice and the cancer society, and are always in need of volunteers as well as donations. As Nancy Symons, of the new Partners in Care Thrift Store in Placerville, says, “We love volunteers and can always use more!” The Snowline Hospice Thrift Store (snowlinehospice.org, 916-984-5853) and the Mercy Hospital of Folsom Auxiliary (916-984-7371) are always in need of volunteers and donations.For the senior who can’t stand to sit still, volunteering just might be the solution. And where better to volunteer than in your own community?

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Fresh & Fruity

06/30/2008 ● By Super Admin

The sun is back and so are the farmers markets. Make the most of your money with these recipes sure to highlight the freshness and flavor of in-season fruits. They are not only a great way to stock up on your daily five; these unique recipes are a fun and fruity way to impress the neighbors at your next barbecue or potluck.Fresh Fruit Salad with Green Tea Glaze3/4 cup water 1 green tea bag with mint1 pinch salt 2 tsp. sugar1/2 cup fresh blueberries1/2 cup fresh raspberries1 cup cantaloupe, cubed 2 cups red seedless watermelon cubedIn a saucepan bring water, salt and sugar to a boil. Turn off heat and place tea bag in the pan to steep for 2 minutes and cool. Rinse fruit then place in a serving bowl and toss with the green tea glaze. Spice Rubbed Grilled Chicken and Nectarines For the spice rub, combine all ingredients in a small bowl, take out enough for this meal and store the rest in an airtight container for 6 months.1/3 cup coarse salt1/4 cup packed brown sugar1/4 cup paprika 2 tbsp. ground black pepper2 tbsp. dried oregano2 tbsp. dried thyme1 tbsp. chili pepper 3 tbsp. vegetable oil3 nectarines, washed, quartered and pitted2 tbsp. sugar4 chicken thighs 4 chicken legs To prepare:Sprinkle quartered nectarines with sugar and set aside. Place chicken pieces in a shallow baking dish. Rub chicken with vegetable oil and season with 1/3 cup of the spice rub (both on and under the skin). Let chicken rest in the refrigerator or grill right away. Heat the grill to medium low and oil the grates. Grill chicken, turning frequently for approximately 20 to 30 minutes, until thermometer reaches 175 degrees. Meanwhile, stack two pieces of 10 x 12 heavy-duty foil on the grill. Place nectarines on foil using a slotted spoon, making sure to reserve the juice. Cover and cook nectarines until soft. Serve on platter with chicken and drizzle the reserved juice over the top. Red, White and Blueberry Trifle 1 angel food cake1 jar raspberry jam 2 cups whipped topping 2 cups low fat vanilla yogurt 2 cups fresh blueberries2 cups fresh raspberries2 cups fresh strawberries, sliced To prepare:Slice angel food cake into 1-inch slices and spread with raspberry jam or fruit spread. Combine vanilla yogurt with whipped topping, folding gently together. Arrange one layer of cake pieces in a large glass bowl or clear trifle bowl. Dollop yogurt mixture over cake pieces, then scatter a portion of the blueberries, strawberries and raspberries over the cake. Repeat layering with remaining cake, yogurt mixture and berries. Set some berries aside to decorate the top. Serve chilled. Plum Butter This is a great way to use up summer plums. With the added herbs – it is ideal to serve with both hot and cold meat dishes. 3 lbs ripe plums, washed, pitted and cut in half2 1/2 cups water2 tbsp. grated orange rind1 & 1/4 cups freshly squeezed orange juice1 & 1/2 tsp. ground cinnamon 4 cups granulated sugarA few springs of fresh rosemary, thyme and sage, optionalTo prepare:Place plums in a large pan with water and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer gently for 40 minutes, or until the plums are very soft. Let cool, then measure the pulp and return to the rinsed out pan. Add the orange rind, juice and cinnamon, and heat gently for 10 minutes. Stir in the sugar (1 & 3/4 cups of sugar for each 2 & 1/2 cups of pulp). Heat gently, stirring frequently, until the sugar has dissolved. Bring to a boil and continue cooking gently until the mixture has thickened. Spoon into warmed sterilized jars, and either use the boiling canning method, the freezer jam method, or refrigerate. If refrigerated, you must use jam within two weeks of opening.

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Clean Slate

06/30/2008 ● By Super Admin

Some of you Superfreaks can remember the good old days. You know, cruising in the Firebird, windows down, belting Earth Wind & Fire lyrics at the top of your lungs. I think Brian Adams said it was the “Summer of ‘69,” but fans of local cover band Clean Slate don’t even know that the years have passed. Clean Slate, a “Rock Steady” collection of eleven musicians and vocalists, is keeping the “Boogie Oggie Oggie” alive at casinos and private parties around the region, and with set lists that include Stevie Wonder, Rick James and Kool and the Gang, it’s no wonder that their events are packed with “Fun fun fun.” “I think it’s the entertainment as well as the energy (that makes Clean Slate so popular),” says lead male vocalist Collings Aki. “I think when people come out to see us and they actually see the band, first impressions are everything. We look sharp and we sound great.” And just because you might not have been a “Bad Girl” tugging on a “Chain of Fools” back in the day, doesn’t mean the soulful sounds of Clean Slate won’t appeal to your modern senses. Clean Slate plays for audience members of all ages. “Whatever crowd is in front of them, they know how to mold to the crowd,” says band manager Scott Mason. “They are one of those groups that just brings a dance party.” The original dance party started a few years back – in 1973, actually – when bassist Mark Noriega was jamming to the day’s top hits and decided to form a high school band called Clean Slate. After school and its associated freedom ended, Noriega grew up and moved on…but not permanently. “I guess it was my midlife crisis,” he says of starting up the band again. “Instead of buying a Harley Davidson, I started playing music and started a garage band. We all have day jobs, so we’ve been doing this as a hobby, but we do about 30 or 40 shows a year.” But don’t mistake their humble beginnings as amateurish; Clean Slate’s members have some serious talent. Trumpeter Steve Russo has played for the United States Air Force Band, Ringling Brothers and Barnum and Bailey Circus and the Glen Miller Orchestra, to name a few, while Brooks Gregory, the band’s saxophonist, has been playing for more than 30 years and started his first band in 1971. “I really do think that the lead singers are what drive the band,” touts Noriega. “Collings is of Hawaiian descent, and he’s got a phenomenal voice, as does Annie Park. It’s amazing how huge her voice is for how small she is; she really does have an Aretha Franklin-type voice.” This summer, fans can hear the band at various venues throughout the area, including the Fourth of July Creek Walk in Vacaville, the Yuba County Fair, and Harvey's Rooftop Celebration in Tahoe, to name a few. Or, of course, if you want high class entertainment at your own event, they are available for private parties, and what a party it will be. “I do this because I love music and I love being able to take people to a place, per se. If a person heard a certain song at a certain point in their life, I want to be able to play it close enough to the real thing,” says Aki. “Because you’re playing someone else’s song, you owe it to that artist to do it just like they did, if not better. We’ve got great musicians and great vocalists, and we just pride ourselves on having fun.” To find out more about Clean Slate, their performance schedule, or to book a show, visit cleanslatehome.com.

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Something M.O.R.E.

06/30/2008 ● By Super Admin

Once young adults with developmental disabilities finish high school, the transition into adulthood comes with a new set of challenges and very few services to support them. Seeing this void in the community, a group of concerned parents and professionals united to form M.O.R.E., or Mother Load Rehabilitation Enterprises, Inc. Established in 1969, the organization sought to find employment opportunities and encourage both independent and interdependent living for its clients. Beginning with only three staff members and eight clients, the staff has grown to 65 and serves more than 200 people per month. They also provide one of the few services for adults with Autism in northern California.Current executive director Susie Davies came to M.O.R.E. 25 years ago as Program Director. Her experience in creating a vocational program at the Hope Rehabilitation Services in San Jose and as coordinator for the Special Olympics in Santa Clara prepared her for this new adventure. “While the job has challenges, I love the people we serve, the staff and my job,” she says. “I look forward to coming to work every day!”In addition to Davies and her wonderful staff, M.O.R.E. relies on the support and contributions of what Davies calls “an awesome group of community leaders.” The Board of Directors consists of 13 devoted members that range from an architect to a retired director at McClellan Air Force Base. There’s also a waiting list to serve on the board; a beautiful, but rare thing in the non-profit world.Though a private, non-profit organization, M.O.R.E. is constantly looking for new ways to raise funds and become less dependent on government dollars. Davies believes that the more productive and self-sufficient the people M.O.R.E. serves become, the happier they are being less dependent on taxpayer money. “Unlike the perception of many, our clients want to earn a paycheck,” she notes. “We offer numerous options from community employment to every functional activity one does in their life.” Proactive in creating new revenue streams, M.O.R.E. operates businesses within their business to provide employment to their clients. These services include recycling, janitorial services, assembling and packaging, and mail services.Perhaps one of the most unique aspects of M.O.R.E. is the Creative Arts Program it offers. With the “Something M.O.R.E.” Art Gallery, these talented artists with no formal training have a place to display their works. “Their art does not conform to the expected,” say Davies. “The art speaks from the souls of our special artists and represents their world of colors, shapes, dreams and reality.”The community can get involved with M.O.R.E. in a couple of ways: First, businesses are invited to become partners, offering rewarding employment opportunities to the clients. And secondly volunteers are welcome to donate time and services on special projects and fundraisers.Approaching its 40th year, M.O.R.E.. was recently honored with the highest level of accreditation bestowed by the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities. This three-year accreditation is a testament to the passion, innovation and enthusiasm surrounding this incredible organization. “I credit the success of M.O.R.E. to the clients we serve, the support provided by their families and care providers, our exceptional board and staff, and the orchestrated team efforts of this organization and the community at large,” say Davies. “It’s the combined efforts of these sectors that make M.O.R.E. so extraordinary.” For additional information on M.O.R.E., visit <a href="http://www.morerehab.org" target="_blank">morerehab.org</a>, or call 530-622-4848.

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