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In Print

Last Updated: 09/30/2008 05:00PM • Subscribe via RSSATOM

Read some articles from back issues of the print edition and supplemental content.

Snapshots from Area Happenings

09/30/2008 ● By Super Admin

“Iron Hills” Youth Triathon7th Annual “Iron Hills” Youth Triathlon held August 9.For more local Outtakes, be sure to pick up this month's copy of Style-Folsom El Dorado Hills edition. Click on the "Get Your Copy" link on the bottom of this page for some of our newsstand locations. Or, to order a copy of this issue, please email Gloria Schroeder at gloria@sierrastyle.com, or call her at 916-988-9888 x116.If you know of any events in the Folsom and El Dorado Hills areas, or have photos you would like to share with us, please submit them to info@sierrastyle.com.

Animal Instincts

09/30/2008 ● By Super Admin

You do not have to be a pet owner or even particularly wild about animals to recognize and support the fact that animal rescue agencies exist because they must. There is a need for their services, and that need extends locally.Thankfully, there’s People for Animal Welfare in El Dorado County (PAWED). According to the organization’s Web site, PAWED is an all-volunteer nonprofit that works to “improve the lives of companion animals in El Dorado County” through adoption, pet care education, advocacy of shelters, and the distribution of supplies to these facilities. Since founding PAWED in 2000, President Charlene Welty has made animal welfare her mission. She says, “there are many who love their animals and provide good care and a lifetime home for them. But unfortunately, there are also some people who abandon, neglect and/or abuse their animals.” Still, Welty reaffirms the fact that El Dorado County residents care deeply about the welfare of animals. And she’s right. Animal welfare resources are plentiful and provide a strong, collaborative response to a serious problem. El Dorado County alone claims four reputable animal shelters, several non-profit organizations that advocate on behalf of animal issues, and numerous private pet-related businesses that donate to animal non-profits and area shelters. Among PAWED’s top priorities are to halt pet overpopulation, to provide disaster response services, to assist in the adoption of shelter pets, and to help keep animals in their homes and out of shelters through public education, identification, training, and assisting residents with new home placements for their pets.Through its efforts, PAWED has successfully changed the perception of what most people still refer to as “the pound” – an antiseptic place without feeling, where nervous animals are caged and uncared for. “It is unfortunate that people may have a negative impression of animal shelters, because they provide an important and essential service in our community,” Welty says. “The animal shelters in El Dorado County today are definitely not the “pounds” of the past. Shelter staff work very hard to protect and care for our community’s companion animals.”Indeed they do. Among their involvement in the aforementioned efforts, volunteers also are active in fund-raising events, such as PAWED Furry Friends Walk-a-Fun, one to two-mile walk for dogs and their people. The event, organized to help raise funds for PAWED’s mobile clinic, will be held October 5, 2008, from 10-11 a.m. at the El Dorado Hills Community Services District Park in conjunction with Bark in Community Park. In addition, PAWED volunteers work adoption events every Saturday from 9:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. at the El Dorado County Animal Shelter in Placerville.“Pets are wonderful companions and they need and deserve a loving and responsible family for their lifetime!” says Welty, who strongly stresses the importance of controlling El Dorado County’s pet population by getting animals spayed and neutered. To learn more about PAWED, adoptions, or how you can volunteer, contact the organization by calling 530-677-2476, or visit pawedpets.org. Download a Furry Friends Walk brochure/registration form at pawedpets.org.

Blazing Heroes

09/30/2008 ● By Super Admin

On July third, I hiked with my son to the top of Mt. Tallac, above Lake Tahoe. From our 9,700-foot vantage point we could see 360 degrees. It was beautifully clear and the lake below us glimmered like an alpine sea. But above us, angel-hair wisps of smoke drifted like cobwebs along the jet stream and to the north a hundred miles or so, a great industrial-sized column of smoke billowed from the hills of Butte County. West of us, in the Desolation Wilderness, Pyramid Peak rose starkly against a sky jaundiced from fires in the American River Canyon. It would be the last nice day we’d have for a while.As I write, it is now mid-July and our air is filled with a choking yellow haze. The smoke from those fires, and others, collects in the valley like a searing fog. It stings the eyes, scratches the throat, and turns anything more than a hundred yards away into ethereal smudges. Like a skein of oil on the surface of water, it seems to settle the very air that carries it. A lid of heat holds it all down and inside we cook. In the foothills it’s worse: the honey-colored haze is sticky and thick among stands of oaks. It doesn’t just dissolve whole ridges, it erases entire mountains. In those mountains, fire crews battle. There are thousands from all across the country and fire stations just down the street. Dressed in lemon yellow and armed with hoses, chainsaws, shovels and bulldozers, and supported from the air by nimble helicopters and lumbering C-130 tanker planes, they climb into the fire, stomping up steep slopes at high elevation, sometimes bearing packs weighing sixty pounds. They drink gallons of water and burn up to 7,000 calories a day. They are streaked with sweat, dirt, grime and soot. They watch for rattlesnakes and poison oak and tree branch torches that burn free from their trunks and fall without warning. They watch the wind, wary of any sudden gusts or unexpected eddies that could rouse the flames and quickly whip them into a life-threatening frenzy. These men and women are scratched and bruised and fatigued to their core. But still they fight, because it’s what they do and it’s what they love. When you live down here among the stoplights, cul-de-sacs and shopping plazas, the wilderness we visit only in the best conditions can become abstract and taken for granted. Now, as it burns and the smoke fills our streets and our lungs, we are reminded once again that all of us—man, beast, and sugar pine forest—are connected.Firefighters, like soldiers and police officers, belong to a profession that we too easily take for granted, until they’re needed. And too often we fail to pay proper tribute unless tragedy strikes.A few weeks after writing the initial portion of this essay, the worst happened and nine firefighters were killed in a helicopter accident in the Shasta-Trinity National Forest. Days before that, two other firefighters lost their lives. Our hearts go out to their families. Our gratitude resides with their memories.In this issue, we celebrate the best this region has to offer. I hope in some small way this piece serves to pay proper homage to the men and women who risked everything to step into the ring of fire this long, hot combustible summer. Catch Tom on the Pat and Tom Morning Show on New Country 105.1 KNCI.

Portland

09/30/2008 ● By Super Admin

Portland – Oregon’s eco-centric green city – is but an hour away by plane, which is a far less expensive way to travel north these days. Upon arrival, expect the unexpected…and a little something more. Portland has culture, character and camaraderie typical of smaller towns; traits that make it stand apart from others of similar and larger size. Saddled with the near impossible task of trying to narrow down style’s five favorite things about Portland, we gave it an admirable go. Why shouldn’t you?PORTLAND ART MUSEUMOne of Portland’s main draws, and the largest museum in the Northwest, is conveniently located downtown. The building itself is historical, and the museum’s grounds are meticulously maintained. The art ain’t too shabby either, what with several noted permanent and visiting collections. portlandartmuseum.org. style tip: Planning an extended family stay in Portland? If so, the museum offers a variety of art programs for kids. Details online.For more about Portland, be sure to pick up this month's copy of Style-Folsom El Dorado Hills edition. Click on the "Get Your Copy" link on the bottom of this page for some of our newsstand locations. Or, to order a copy of this issue, please email Gloria Schroeder at gloria@sierrastyle.com, or call her at 916-988-9888 x116.

Chocolate Kisses

09/30/2008 ● By Super Admin

1. Autumn floral arrangement, price varies on your order at By the Gate, Diamond Springs. 530-622-7834, bythegateflowers.com.For more Swag, be sure to pick up this month's copy of FoothillStyle. Click on the "Get Your Copy" link on the bottom of this page for some of our newsstand locations. Or, to order a copy of this issue, please email Gloria Schroeder at gloria@sierrastyle.com, or call her at 916-988-9888 x116.

Bistro 33

09/30/2008 ● By Super Admin

Seven seems to be Chef Fred Haines’ lucky number. He is a seventh generation Sacramentan, he ranked seventh in a national ski competition in the 44-49 age group and he and his brother opened their seventh restaurant this year, called Tre, located on Howe Avenue in Sacramento. Tre features a chef’s table in the kitchen with community seating that can be bought by the hour as a group or individually. “The chef is constantly making things and breaking it into smaller portions. It can be really fun.”Chef Haines’ foundation of culinary knowledge began in the early days with many hours in the kitchen with his mother, and then he spent much time learning with the big chefs of the world including Thomas Keller, Daniel Boulud and Catherine Brandel. Haines was also fortunate enough to work for Restaurants Unlimited in Hawaii, where he picked up even more skills.Above all, Chef Haines’ favorite canvas is salmon. “The theme of Bistro 33 is northwest-inspired, a lot of hardwood roasting of salmon, with things like blueberries and hazelnuts.” The bistro strives to provide a scenic setting with a comfortable atmosphere and a sensible price. “We cook with the idea of flavor first and work on being reasonable so people can have a great night out, even in today’s economy.”For more about Chef Fred Haines including his recipe for Ginger Cream Sauce, be sure to pick up this month's copy of Style-Folsom El Dorado Hills edition. Click on the "Get Your Copy" link on the bottom of this page for some of our newsstand locations. Or, to order a copy of this issue, please email Gloria Schroeder at gloria@sierrastyle.com, or call her at 916-988-9888 x116.

Chocolate Kisses

09/30/2008 ● By Super Admin

Softest Blanket Ever in dark chocolate/ivory, $175 at Periwinkle, Folsom. 916-985-8767, periwinklegifts.com.For more Swag, be sure to pick up this month's copy of Style-Folsom El Dorado Hills edition. Click on the "Get Your Copy" link on the bottom of this page for some of our newsstand locations. Or, to order a copy of this issue, please email Gloria Schroeder at gloria@sierrastyle.com, or call her at 916-988-9888 x116.

Portland

09/30/2008 ● By Super Admin

Portland – Oregon’s eco-centric green city – is but an hour away by plane, which is a far less expensive way to travel north these days. Upon arrival, expect the unexpected…and a little something more. Portland has culture, character and camaraderie typical of smaller towns; traits that make it stand apart from others of similar and larger size. Saddled with the near impossible task of trying to narrow down style’s five favorite things about Portland, we gave it an admirable go. Why shouldn’t you?ALBERTA STREETIf antsy for artistic inspiration, head to gallery-rich Alberta Street. This once sketchy district has been revitalized by the vibrant work of Portland’s craftiest. A number of galleries house garden art and fiber arts, watercolors, photography, metal work, jewelry and more. Alberta Street is also a great place to grab a refreshing salad, a steaming cup of coffee and a seat on the curb to listen to whatever musician happens to be yodeling there at the time. portlandneighborhood.com. style tip:  Fly into town at the end of the month for Last Thursday Art Walk; vendor mayhem included. For more about Portland, be sure to pick up this month's copy of FoothillStyle edition. Click on the "Get Your Copy" link on the bottom of this page for some of our newsstand locations. Or, to order a copy of this issue, please email Gloria Schroeder at gloria@sierrastyle.com, or call her at 916-988-9888 x116.

Scott Becker

09/30/2008 ● By Super Admin

Scott Becker remembers when skateboarding wasn’t as simple as going to the local skate park. A veteran of the NorCal skating scene, Scott has watched skateboarding change from an underground group of “pool riders” to a legitimate sport backed by the X-Games. “Kids today don’t realize how hard it was. As a teen in Placerville, it was illegal to ride a skateboard anywhere. My first ticket in the ’80s was a skateboarding ticket. We rallied, met with city council and got land donated [for skate parks]. It only took 20 years to make it happen.”Back then, Scott and his friends hunted for empty swimming pools to conquer, a tradition that started in the ’70s. “We used to drive around at about 7.5 miles an hour, looking through slats of fences [to find] one that was empty or close to being empty.” Sometimes they’d ask permission from the owners, but other times the mission was to catch as much air as possible before getting chased off the property.  When asked why he still skates after more than 20 years and a host of broken bones and injuries, Scott admits that skating is his own form of therapy. “When you’re standing at the end of a deep swimming pool, going horizontal to vertical, zero to 20 miles an hour, everything you were thinking about before – it’s gone. You’re just thinking about holding onto that skateboard.”  For more on Scott Becker be sure to pick up this month's copy of Style-Folsom El Dorado Hills edition. Click on the "Get Your Copy" link on the bottom of this page for some of our newsstand locations. Or, to order a copy of this issue, please email Gloria Schroeder at gloria@sierrastyle.com, or call her at 916-988-9888 x116.

Medical Myths

09/30/2008 ● By Super Admin

Medical information can be confusing. New data is continually released and is often appealing to the hopeful, the nervous and the health conscious. Style consulted with three local medical professionals and gathered some of the misperceptions they encounter on a regular basis, as well as the information to set the record straight.Marshall Medical Center 11. Cracking your knuckles causes arthritis. The cracking or popping sound that you hear is simply the breaking of the adhesive seal in the joint, and there is no evidence to show that this causes arthritis. 12. Bed rest is a useful therapy. Studies have repeatedly found that early mobilization is better than bed rest for prevention and treatment of some medical conditions.13. Antibiotics should be used to treat acute sinusitis. Patients with severe signs and symptoms of sinusitis lasting longer than 10 days may benefit from antibiotics, while less severe cases may do just as well without them.14. Drink eight glasses of water per day. There has never been a scientific study to support this. Let your thirst guide your fluid intake unless there is a specific medical reason to do differently. The major exceptions are during exercise or when working out in the heat—drink plenty of water to remain hydrated. 15. You can get the flu from getting a flu shot. You cannot get the flu from a flu vaccine. Some people who get the vaccine might still get the flu, but they will usually get a milder case than people who are not vaccinated. – Family Physician Lance Holtry, D.O. For more Medical Myths numbers one through 10, be sure to pick up this month's copy of FoothillStyle. Click on the "Get Your Copy" link on the bottom of this page for some of our newsstand locations. Or, to order a copy of this issue, please email Gloria Schroeder at gloria@sierrastyle.com, or call her at 916-988-9888 x116.

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