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Placer, El Dorado Counties and Folsom Ideal for Bikers of All Abilities

03/26/2015 11:32AM ● Published by Kristen Castillo

Fresh air, exercise and the thrill of pedal power are all enticing. Maybe that’s why cycling is so popular. In fact, more Californians are biking now than they were a decade ago. According to a California Household Travel Survey of approximately 109,000 persons from more than 42,000 households in 58 California counties, “The percentage of California residents walking, biking or using public transportation on a typical day has more than doubled since 2000.” In other words, 23 percent of household trips are taken by walking, biking and public transportation, compared to just 11 percent in 2000. The full survey, released in 2013, indicates about 1.5 percent of trips were made by bike, with cyclists spending about 18 minutes on each bike trip.

PERFECT PLACE TO RIDE

Our own backyard and the surrounding region—from Placer County and Folsom to El Dorado County—is two-wheel friendly, year-round. “Our climate is ideally suited for bike riding,” says Michael Dour, alternative transportation analyst for the City of Roseville, noting winters and springs in places like the East Coast and in the Rockies are snowy and cold, “...while we enjoy 70-degree temps and sunshine!”

Another plus for cycling? Our communities are bike approachable. In Roseville, for example, the terrain is relatively flat, which works for beginning cyclists. The area has 32 miles of paved off-street paths and over 90 miles of on-street bike lanes. Advanced cyclists can find challenging routes in nearby foothills communities. In El Dorado Hills, there are cycling spots for beginner, intermediate and advanced cyclists. “Our local cycling trails are ideal for connecting with nature,” says Judy Klein with the El Dorado Hills Community Services District Parks and Recreation Department. She recommends beginners try the American River Bike Trail (Jedediah Smith Memorial Trail), a 32-mile path that’s good for leisure bike rides. Intermediate riders will like Salmon Falls/Sweetwater Trail—a seven-mile route with great views near El Dorado Hills. Klein recommends advanced riders check out Clementine Loop near Auburn, saying the 11-mile route...offers lots and lots of climbing. Be in shape because it’s definitely a physical challenge.” 

GETTING STARTED

Whether you’re a novice or a pro, cycling is all about getting on the bike. Start slow and work your way up to more advanced trails. “My advice is to first determine what your ultimate goal is,” says Klein. “Do you want to be a leisure cyclist or an expert? Once you decide, set your fitness and training goals accordingly.” If you don’t have a bike, visit a local bike shop to get one that’s right for your cycling goals. “Educate yourself on biking in traffic and know the rules [of the road],” Klein says. Once you have your bike and helmet, your cycling adventure can begin!

CYCLE STYLES

When it comes to biking, the styles of riding are as plentiful as the trails. Here we introduce you to five local riders who each embrace different styles of cycling. Read on as they share what motivates them to ride, their biggest safety tip and favorite gear.

Brian Joder  photos by Dante Fontana  Style Media Group

Meet the Riders – Brian Joder

Embrace the Biking Buzz Read More » 

 


Chris Lim  Photo by Dante Fontana  Style Media Group

Meet the Riders – Chris Lim

Embrace the Biking Buzz Read More » 

 

 

Safeguard Your Ride: Preventing Bike Theft

Over 1.5 million bikes are stolen across the country every year. So how can you protect your ride?
Sacramento Area Bicycle Advocates (SABA) recommends U-locks and heavy-duty chain locks, both of which are tough to cut, which may deter thieves. They warn that cable locks aren’t very effective, since they’re easy to cut with concealed tools.

  • Make sure you lock the bike frame to a bike rack or post. Looping the lock through one or both wheels is added security. Avoid bike racks that can be easily cut or broken, such as a chain link fence.
  • SABA’s picks for the best bike racks? Inverted U, A, Post and Loop, and the Stanford Rack, all of which offer frame stability. They don’t recommend locking your bike on wave, comb or toast racks, which aren’t stable.
  • They also recommend registering your bike with Sacramento’s Ride On! program, a free online bike registry. Another security measure? Write down (and take photos of) your bike’s serial number so if it’s stolen, you can track it with the police if they recover stolen bikes. Keep copies of receipts for the bike too, which can help you with insurance claims if needed.

HAVE A BIKE YOU’RE NOT USING ANYMORE?

DON’T JUST LEAVE IT IN YOUR GARAGE. DONATE IT TO CYCLES 4 HOPE, A LOCAL ORGANIZATION THAT WILL GIFT IT TO SOMEONE IN THE HOMELESS POPULATION—HELPING THEM GAIN INDEPENDENCE AND OPPORTUNITY.

Cycles 4 Hope - Apr 13 2015 1147AM

Cycles 4 Hope

Empowering the Homeless One Bike at a Time Read More » 

 

 





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